confidence as the key
to your business

The unwillingness to take risks and the under estimation of ability leads to latent and unused skills, an imbalance in gender representation, frustration, anxiety and lost revenue as opportunities may be missed.

Consider for a moment, how many times have you been impressed at interview by the level of confidence portrayed by a candidate and how many times does that tip over to your view of arrogance?

A study by psychologists David Dunning and Joyce Ehrlinger found a tendency for some people to substantially overestimate their abilities and that the less competent people are, the more they overestimate their abilities. They then moved their research to focus specifically on women, giving male and female college students a quiz on scientific reasoning where they rated their own scientific skills before the quiz and then whether they thought they had got a set of scientific questions correct. The women rated themselves more negatively than men on scientific ability (13%) and also felt that they scored 13 lower than the men did and yet the actual results on the quiz were almost the same—women got 7.5 out of 10 correct and men 7.9.

Which Genders Participated by Percentage

The students were then invited to participate in a science competition for prizes. Only 49 percent of women signed up for the competition, compared with 71 percent of the men.

Social psychologist Brenda Major from the University of California at Santa Barbara studied this tendency early on in her career as a young professor and found that when she asked men and women how they thought they were going to do on a variety of tasks, she found that the men consistently overestimated their abilities and subsequent performance, and that the women routinely underestimated both. The actual performances did not differ in quality.

Tomas Chamorri-Premuzic, professor at University College London, states in an interview for the Harvard Business review that confident people tend to be more charismatic, extroverted, and socially skilled. In reality however, there is a very big difference between confidence and competence. Competent people are generally confident, but confident people are generally not competent. But instead are just good at hiding their incompetence and their insecurities.

So what effect does this have on your business? Well think about it – over estimating ability leads to misconception, stress, mistakes, mistrust and the unfulfilment of targets.

The unwillingness to take risks and the under estimation of ability leads to latent and unused skills, an imbalance in gender representation, frustration, anxiety and lost revenue as opportunities may be missed.

Now we wouldn’t be surprised if you are now thinking that this confidence issue is a bit of a minefield and yet the answer is simple – it is about enhancing your people’s authentic confidence and strength as well as their self-realisation and emotional intelligence thus enabling them to recognise their strengths, weaknesses and need for skill enhancement to bring the greatest positive impact to your business and their own fulfilment in their roles.

And what about you as a business owner? How many times has your fear of lack of confidence stopped you moving your business forward or successfully negotiating that deal?

Contact us to learn more about this area and discuss how confidence and self-realisation training can make a difference to your organisation’s effectiveness and growth.